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Friday, 24 November 2017

Dutch M-frigate Zr.Ms. Van Speijk (F828) 1991-

Den Helder, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 245962000 and call sign PAMB. The Van Speijk was the eight and at the same time the last ship of the Karel-Doorman class, laid down on 1 October 1991, launched on 26 March 1994 and commissioned on 7 September 1995. With a displacement of 2,800 long tons/2,845 tons (standard)-3,320 long tons/3,373 tons (full load) are the dimensions 122 x 14,4 x 6,2 metres or 400'3"x 47'3"x 20'4". The 2 Rolls-Royce Spey 1A gas turbines supplied 16,700 hp and the 2x Werkspoor diesel engines supplied 4,895 hp allowing a speed of 29 knots. Her crew numbered 154 men. The original armament consisted of 1-7,6cm gun, 1-2 cm gun, Harpoon anti-ship missiles, Mark 46 torpedoes, a 16-cell Sea Sparrow missile vertical launch system and a goalkeeper and a Lynx helicopter. 

Norway strengthening her coastal defence according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 8

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated May 1939 reporting that in Norway coastal defences were made in the outer fjords, at Ramsund, north Norway was a third naval district established, at Tromsö was an airfield and in some north Norwegian harbours were 15.000 tons of fuel oil and coal stored. The service was enlarged from 72 to 84 days and the number of sea militia increased from 440 tot 640 men. On the navy yard were the torpedo and mine workshops expanded. 

Italian shipyards building warships for Yugoslavia according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 8

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated May 1939 reporting that Italian shipyards were building for Yugoslavian account 2-10.000 ton cruisers and a coastal vessel. 

Greece asked the British cabinet for navy officers for training and advices according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 8

An item referred to the Proceedings dated May 1939 reporting that Greece asked the British cabinet to sent some navy officers which could act as trainers and maritime advisors for Greece. 

Sweden transferring naval base from Stockholm towards Erstavik according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated April 1939 reporting that the naval base at Stockholm, Sweden was to be transferred to Erstavik, 11 kilometres south east of Stockholm. Building costs 60 million crones. Among the planned facilities were 2 floating dry docks with respectively 5.500 and 2.000 lifting capacity and one graven dock with as dimensions 160 x 25 x 10 metres. 

Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. Van Amstel (F831) 1988-

Den Helder, Netherlands 28 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 245965000 and call sign PAME. Of the Karel Dooman-class consisting of  the Karel Doorman (became Belgian Leopold), Van Speijk, Van Amstel, Willem van der Zaan (became Belgian Louise-Marie), Tjerk Hiddes (became Chilean Almirante Riveros), Abraham van der Hulst (became Chilean Almirante Blanco Encalada(, Van Nes (became Portuguese Bartolomeu Dias) and Van Galen (became Portuguese D. Francisco de Almeida). Laid down at the Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands on 3 May 1988, launched on 19 May 1991 and commissioned on 27 May 1993. Displacement 3,300 tons and as dimensions 122,25 x 14,37 x 4,3 metres. Crew numbers 154 men. Machinery consists of 33.800 hp via 2 Rolls Royce (Spey 1A) gas turbines and 9.790 hp delivered by 2 Stork-Werkspoor diesels diesel engines allowing a speed of 29 knots. Armament consists of 8 Harpoon SMM missiles, 1-7,6cm Oto-Melara, gun, 16 NATO Seasparrow VLS, 2-2cm Oerlikon machineguns, 2x2 Mk32 torpedo tubes, 1-SGE-30 Goalkeeper and 1 NH-90 helicopter. 

Dutch landing craft utility L9526 1998-

Inner harbour of Den Helder, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Built by scheepswerf Visser, Den Helder, Netherlands in 1998 for to serve in cooperation with the Landing platform dock Zr. Ms. Rotterdam. Later lengthened. 

Maltese galley Santa Croce 1597

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) in 1597 with as commanding officer Don Diego de Britto.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Maltese galley San Filippo 1597

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) in 1597 with as commanding officer Bernardino Barba.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Maltese galley Sant’Angelo 1597

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 6 February 1597 with as commanding officer Lanfranco Ceba

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Maltese galley San Giovanni 1596

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 4 September 1596 with as commanding officer Giovanni Francesco Bernardini.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Maltese galley Santa Fede 1596

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 17 August 1596 with as commanding officer Giorgio de Castellana.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Dutch pilot cutter Texel no. 1 1870-1900


Served on the Zuiderzee what nowadays is known as Ijsselmeer after she was closed in 1932 by the so-called Afsluitdijk creating a huge inland bay which is since then partly drained. The painting was made by J.G.G. Fenenga in 1882. 

Dutch cutter annex crane ship (ex-Catjan 1981-1986, Cornelia 1986-1991, Gerdia 1991-1999, Cornelia 1999-2006) Gerdia (WR82) 1981-

Inner harbour of Den Helder, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8135899, MMSI 244077000 and call sign PEHN. Built by De Hoop, Hardinxveld-Giessendam, Netherlands in 1981. Owned by Visserijbedrijf Gerdia b.v., Hippolyushoef, Netherlands. Ex-Catjan renamed 1986, Cornelia renamed June 1991, Gerdia renamed March 1999 and Cornelia renamed December 2006. WR stands for Wieringen. 

Dutch fishing vessel (ex-Semper Confidens 1988-1995, Dolfijn 1995-2007) Johan Prins (WR-10) 2007-

Inner harbour of Den Helder, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8804464, MMSI 244592000 and call sign PCDP. Built by Scheepswerf Gebroeders Kooiman, Zwijndrecht, Netherlands in 1988. Ex-Semper Confidens renamed January 1995 and Dolfijn renamed March 2007. 

Dutch inland dredger ship Adelaar 1959-

Den Helder, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 244690118, call sign PF9538 and ENI 2312319. Built by Sleephelling Mij. Scheveningen, Scheveningen, Netherlands for account of de Boer Baggerbedrijf, Sliedrecht, Netherlands in 1959. 

Thursday, 23 November 2017

The new British King George V-class battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1939 no. 2


An item referred to the U.S.R. dated 29 December 1938 reporting that the 5 British battleships to be launched in 1939 and to be named King George V, Prince of Wales (ex-King Edward VIII), Beatty (renamed Howe), Jellicoe (renamed Anson) and Anson (renamed Duke of York) were to have a displacement of 35.000 tons,2 masts, 2 funnels and probably 10-38cm/14.9” guns as main armament (1x4 and 1x2 fore, 1x4 aft), a powerful second armament but none torpedo tubes. The weight of the armour was estimated to be 13.000 ton, the horsepower 130.000hp and the maximum speed above the 30 miles. It was the first time that the Royal British Navy fitted out warships with quadruple gun turrets. 

Anti aircraft armament needed better splinter protection according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 7

An item referred to the Marine Rundschau dated October 1938 which published an article of the German korvettenkapitän Hülsemann dealing with the protection of the (light) anti aircraft armament. He pointed out that the anti aircraft armament, especially the smaller part, usually hardly was protected against splinters. In new to be built ships was this problem to be taken care of according to the author. 

Minelayers under construction for the Turkish navy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Revista Marittime dated September 1938 reporting that at Guldjuk the 500 ton minelayer Atak (1) was launched which was the first in Turkey built warship. Immediately after the launching was the keel laid down of a sister ship the Dolgitsch. The 6.000 ton measuring yacht Savarona (2) was bought for personal use by president Ataturk.

Notes
1. Laid down by Gölcük Tersanesi in 1937, launched in 1938, completed in 1938 and stricken in begin 1961. Hull used of a tug. Dimensions 44,0 x 8,00 x 3,00 metres. Able to take 40 mines with her.
2. Launched by Blohm&Voss, Hamburg, Germany with yard number 490 on 28 February 1931, completed in March 1931, sold by Emily Roebling Cadwallader to the Turkish government in 1938, modernized into a state yacht in 2014, still existing. IMO 5314810 and MMSI 271000250. Gross tonnage 4.646 tons and as dimensions 124 (waterline)-136 (stern to bowsprit) x 53 x 20 metres or 408-446 x 53 x 20 feet. 

Turkish navy commissioned German built motor torpedo boats according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Revista Marittime dated September 1938 reporting that in May 1938 the Turkish navy commissioned the by German shipyards wood built motor torpedo boats which were named No. 1 Oryen, No. 2 Velebit, No. 3 Dinara, No. 4 Triglav, No. 5 Suvobor, No. 6 Rudnik, No. 7 Kaymakhalan and No. 8 Dovrmitor. Displacement 60 tons. Gasoline engines with a total horsepower of 3.000hp and allowing a maximum speed of 38 knots. The armament consisted of 2 torpedo tubes and 1 machinegun. 

Dutch ro-ro/passenger ship (ex-Zalgiris 1988-2010) Joline 2010-

Den Helder, Netherlands 27 September 2010

Latvia-flagged, homeport Riga, Latvia, IMO 8743969, MMSI 275402000 and call sign YL2724. Ex-Zalgiris renamed July 2010. Owned and managed by Barco de Vapor B.V., Berkhout, Netherlands. Built by Baltija Shipbuilding Yard, Klaipeda, Lithuania in 1988. Between 1988-2010 Lithianua-flagged with as homeport Klaipeda and owned by Smiltynes Perkela, Klaipeda, Lithuania. 

Dutch inland law enforce vessel Breesem 1964-

Den Helder, Netherlands 27 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Den Oever, Netherlands, MMSI 244917000, call sign PBVB and registration number 160-64. Built by Gebr. Akerboom, Oestgeest, Netherlands for account of Verkeer&Waterstaat Rijkswaterstaat directie Noord-Holland in 1964. 

Dutch inland tanker (ex-Willem Kruijff 1987-2002) Gulf Eskimo 2002-

Den Helder, Netherlands 27 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 244670280, EU number 209504 and call sign PD5025. Ex-Willem Kruijff of Gebr. Kruijff, Den Helder, Netherlands and since 2002 Gulf Eskimo of Gulf Oil Nederland B.V., Den Helder. Built by Visser, Den Helder, Netherlands with yard number 117 in 1987. 

Dutch research/survey vessel Asterias 1998-

Den Helder, Netherlands 27 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8943545, MMSI 246017000, registration number 833-98 and call sign PGBM. Built by Scheepswerf Graeve, Grave, Netherlands for account of Rijkswaterstaat directie Noord-Nederlands, Leeuwarden, Netherlands in 1998. 

Inland dredger Kaatje Mossel

Den Helder, Netherlands 27 September 2010

Maltese galley Santa Croce 1596

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 31 March 1596 with as commanding officer Don Diego de Britto.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595.

Maltese galley Santa Croce 1595

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 7 June 1595 with as commanding officer Antonio de Chestuel.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595.

Maltese galley Santa Fede 1595

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 7 June 1595 with as commanding officer Luigi de Seracurt.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595.

Maltese galley Vittoria 1595

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 19 May 1595 with as commanding officer Francesco Moleti.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595

Maltese galley Sant’Anna 1595

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 19 May 1595 with as commanding officer Honofrio Copones.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Wednesday, 22 November 2017

American battleship USS Wisconsin (BB-64) 1941-

South Dakota-class

Iowa-class

Montana-class

Part of the Iowa-class consisting of the Iowa, New Jersey, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois and Kentucky, for escorting Fast Carrier Task Forces on the Pacific Ocean, preceded by the South Dakota-class and succeeded by the never realized Montana-class. The designing-process of a fast battleship started in 1938. Building ordered on 12 June 1940, laid down on Philadelphia Navy Yard on 25 January 1941, launched by Mrs. Goodland on 7 December 1943, commissioned on 16 April 1944, decommissioned on 1 July 1948, recommissioned on 3 March 1951, decommissioned on 8 March 1958, reactivated on 1 August 1986, modernized, recommissioned on 22 October 1988, decommissioned on 30 September 1991, stricken on 17 March 2006 becoming a museum ship. Except for the Second World War also active in the Korean War (1950-1952)and in Operation Desert Storm (January-February 1991).




General technical class specifications. Displacement 45.000 (standard)-52.000 (mean war service)-57.000 (full load before the 1980s)-58.000 (full load after the 1980s) tons and as dimensions 262,5 (between perpendiculars)-270,43 (over all)x 32,97 x 11,33 metres or 861¼-887’3”x 108’2” x 37’2”. The machinery consisted of General Electric geared steam turbines and 8 water tube boilers delivering 212.000 shp. Speed 32,5-35,2 (light load) 3 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 14.890 miles. Crew numbered 1.921 men. Original armament in 1943: 3x3-40,6cm/16” /50 cal Mark 7 guns, 20-12,7cm/5” /38 cal Mark 12 guns, 80-4cm /56cal anti aircraft guns and 49-2cm /70 cal anti aircraft guns. Armament in 1983: 3x3-40,6cm/16” /50 cal Mark 7 guns, 12-12,7cm/5” /38 cal Mark 12 guns, 32 BGM-109 Tomahawk cruise missiles, 16 RGM084 Harpoon Anti-Ship missiles and 4-2cm /76 cal Phalanx CIWS. Armour consisted of a 30,73cm/12.1” thick belt, 28,7cm/11.3” thick bulkheads, 19,05cm/7.5” thick decks with the barbettes and turrets protected by respectively 29,46cm/11.6”-43,94cm/17.3” and 50cm/19.7”. 





All photograps are supplied by the very interesting website MUSEUM SHIPS, for which our thanks

Russian Delta and Foxtrot submarines


The Project 641 class preceded by the Zulu-class and succeeded by the Tango-class was named Foxtrot by the NATO. Totally 58 were built between 1957-1983 by the Sudomek division, Admiralty Shipyard/Yard 196, Leningrad/St. Petersburg, Russia for the Soviet navy. Together for the submarines for other countries is the total number 74 boats. Foxtrot submarines were used by the Soviet/Russian, Libyan, Indian, Cuban, Ukrainian and Polish navies.

Displacement 1.983 (surfaced)-2.515 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 89,9 x 7,4 x 5,9 metres or 294.11 x 24.3 x 19.4 feet. The machinery consisted of 3-2.000hp diesels and 3-electric motors (2x1.350&1x2,700hp) and 1-80hp auxiliary motor driving 3 shafts and 3 screws allowing a speed of 16 (surfaced)-15 (submerged)-9 (snorkelling) knots and a range of 20.000 (surfaced with a speed of 8 knots)-11.000 (snorkelling)-380 (submerged with a speed of 2 knots) nautical miles. Able to stay 3-5 days while submerged. Test diving depth varied between 246 metres/807 feet-296 metres/971 feet. Their crew numbered 78 men. The armament consisted of 10-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes (6 bow, 4 stern) for which 22 torpedoes could be carried.

The Projects 667B Murena, 667bD Murena-M, 667BDR Kalmar and 667BDRM Delfin classes nuclear ballistic missiles submarines, preceded by the Yankee-class and the Delta IV by the Typhoon-class and succeeded by the Borei-class were known by the NATO as Delta-class. Totally were 43 boats built.

With a displacement of 7.800 (surfaced)-10.000 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 139 x 12 x 9 metres or 456 x 39,4 x 29,6 feet for the Delta I-class increasing to a final displacement of 13.500 (surfaced)-18.200 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 166 x 12,3 x 8,8 metres or 544.7 x 40.4 x 29 feet. The last versions had an armament of 4-53,3cm/21” bow torpedo tubes and 16 missiles. 

Canadian navy to be strengthened according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1939 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine U.S.R. dated 15 December 1938 reporting that for the strengthening of the Canadian defence a budget of 9-10 million pound sterling was available. This was comparable with the budget Australia needed to buy a battleship. In fact were 2 destroyers and 4 minesweepers to be added to the fleet. The strategically important island Anticosti, Gulf of St. Lawrence (1) was the fitted out with coastal defence works. In the Canadian press were articles published that Germany was very interested in this island.

Note
1. In the province of Quebec at the outlet of the Saint Lawrence River. In July 1937 wanted Dutch and German capitalists to buy the island for building a sulphite mill. Newspapers suggested that when German surveyors visited the island it were in fact military experts. The offer was never accepted

Building of French battleship Richelieu less delayed as earlier feared for according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 6

Dunkerque



An item referred to the Proceedings dated March 1939 reporting that the delay in the building of the French battleship Richelieu (1) was less considerable as first feared for. The private industry worked a lot of extra hours above the official 40 hours a week. The necessity for waiting for the delivery of materials however caused also delay.

Note
1. Richelieu-class consisting of the Richelieu, Gascogne, Jean Bart and Clemenceau, preceded by the Dunkerque-class and succeeded by the never realized Alsace-class. Designed as an answer on the Italian Vittorio Veneto-class battleships (1) while Italy and not Germany was the main threat for France regarded the supremacy in the Mediterranean. As a result of building under different programs were the ship not entirely similar. Laid down at the Brest Navy Yard, France on 22 October 1935, launched in the Salou no. 4 graving dock on 17 January 1939, bow and stern parts were with the hull assembled  in the Laninon dock no. 9, trials in April 1940, commissioned in June 1940, part of the forces of Vichy France, attacked by British Royal Air Force while lying at Dakar, Senegal - afraid she would fell in German hands, on 8 July 1940, involved in the Battle of Dakar against Free French and British forces between 23-25 September 1940, departed for the USA on 30 January 1943, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard overhauled and repaired, commissioned in October 1943, accommodation ship at Brest since 21 May 1956, laid up in reserve in 1958, condemned in 16 January 1968, renamed Q432 and breaking up at Cantieri Navali Santa Maria, Genoa, Italy started in September 1968. 

Japanese navy probably to introduce 45,7cm guns according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 6

The Japanese No. 13-class

An item referred to the British monthly magazine The Navy reporting that Japan in the near future probably would introduce the 45,7cm/18” gun. The same calibre was also to be used as main armament for the battleships (1) under construction in 1922 but never completed due to the limits of the Naval Treaty of Washington.(2)

Notes
1. The Number-13 class 46.700 tons fast battleships was cancelled on 19 November 1923 even before the building could be started. Their main armament was to consist of 4x2-18”guns.
2. Naval Treaty of Washington between the United States, British Empire, Japan, France and Italy signed on 6 February 1922 as a result of the Washington Naval Conference between November 1921-February 1922 which intended to limit the total capitals ship tonnage of these five major powers. 

Norwegian offshore supply ship Troms Fjord 2005-

Den Helder, Netherlands 20 September 2010

Isle of Man-flagged, homeport Douglas, Isle of Man, IMO 9348211, MMSI 235083745 and call sign 2EBO5. Owned and managed by Troms Offshore, Tromso, Norway. Built by Palmer Johnson Norway, Flekkefjord, Norway in 2005. 

Norwegian offshore supply ship Island Endeavour 2008-


Off Den Helder, Netherlands 27 September 2010

Norway-flagged, homeport Aalesund, Norway, IMO 9402342, MMSI 258437000 and call sign LAKQ3. Owned and managed by Island Offshore Management, Ulsteinvik, Norway. Built by Vard Brevik, Brevik, Norway in 2008. 

Dutch passenger ship Dokter Wagemaker 2005-

Off Den Helder, Netherlands 27 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9294070, MMSI 244030035 and call sign PH5436. Owned and managed by Texels Eigen Stoomboot, Den Hoorn, Netherlands. Built by Damen Shipyard Galati, Galati, Netherlands in 2005. 

Maltese galley Sant’Anna 1592

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 13 February 1592 with as commanding officer Gabriel le Petit dit Le Vaguil.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Maltese galley Sant’Anna 1590

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) 27 August 1590 with as commanding officer Maurizio Lesch.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595.

Maltese galley Santa Marta 1585

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 30 May 1585 with as commanding officer Francescp Buondelmonte.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Maltese galley San Giovanni 1584

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 2 November 1584 with as commanding officer Don Ferdinando de Hinistrosa.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595.

Maltese galley San Giacomo 1584

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 2 November 1584 with as commanding officer Don Ferdinand d‘Eredia.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Tuesday, 21 November 2017

Modern whaling harpoon (20th Century)

Oudeschild, Texel, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Since 1737 is in the whaling experimented with explosive guns using cannon-fired or even rocket-propelled harpoons. In 1870 however the Norwegian Svend Foyn invented the modern explosive harpoon and gun and despite alterations is his design still used as basic.

The minimum design demands for modern submarines according to Dutch naval experts around 1930

In the Lecture dated 28 March 1930 for aspirant officers of the Royal Netherlands Navy Reserve in the Dutch East Indies was explained what kind of demands a designer had to deal with to come with a compromised design including as much as possible of the demands still without increasing the displacement. The lecturer mentioned that the main task of a submarine was to nearer the enemy without being sighted and to manoeuvre in such a position that she was able to torpedo her target. Large displacements were a disadvantage and submarines were just successful when they operated in large numbers. Large number of small submarines were to prefer above a few large submarines. The main reason to decide to increase the displacement was heavier military demands.

An armament of at least 4-53,3cm torpedo tubes pointing out in the same direction It was believed that a modern warship could not be sunk by a single torpedo and considering the low chance of success of a torpedo  a salvo of several torpedoes was to be preferred. Usually 1-7,5cm/2,9”-10cm/2.93” gun probably also to be used as anti aircraft guns and some machineguns (4cm/1.57” anti aircraft machineguns were preferable).

Buoyancy of at least 20-25% of the displacement.

Maximum diving depth 60-100 metres needed to be invisible for air reconnaissance but also for escaping from attacks with depth charges. For the latter purpose was the as much as possible strength of the hull of utmost importance.

Surfaced speed and range were depending on the purpose of the submarine, when submerged a maximum speed of 8-10 miles. Increasing the submerged speed caused an relatively enormous increase of the weight.

Emergency dive time less than 60 seconds.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff (National Archive, The Hague, Netherlands) inv. no. 291. Lecture dated 28 March 1930 for aspirant officers of the Royal Navy Reserve in the Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch sailing passenger ship (ex-Grada 1892-1915, Martha 1915-1955, Oudertrouw 1955-1986, Fatum Ferenda 1986-1994, Martha 1994-2000) Vliegende Hollander 2007-


Oudeschild, Texel, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Netherlandss-flagged, homeport Spakenburg, Netherlands, ENI 03010002, MMSI 244700780 and call sign PE3793. Laid down as the iron clipper sailing ship Grada of 130last/5.000 quintals on 25 February 1892 by J. Meijer, at his ship at Beneden-Leeuwen, Netherlands for C.J.W. Sijp, Tiel, Netherlands, who was a merchant in coal, launched some days before 26 July 1892, renamed Martha in 1915 of J. de Jong&H. Rogaar, Rotterdam, Netherlands, since 1920 of J. de Jong, Rotterdam, renamed Oudertrouw of R. de Jong, Rotterdam in 1955, rebuilt as a motor cargo ship in 1960, renamed Fatum Ferenda in 1986 of Fatum Ferenda Vof, Nieuwegein, Netherlands, renamed Martha in 1994 of R. Atkin, Amsterdam, Netherlands and converted into the sailing passenger ship Vliegende Hollander of K. van Twillaert, Kampen, Netherlands. Tonnage 246 tons and as dimensions 36,78 x 6,05 x 1,69 metres and 133 tons and as dimensions 39,02 x 6,05 x 1,40 metres. 

The design demands for the diving depth of submarines according to Dutch naval experts around 1930

In the Lecture dated 28 March 1930 for aspirant officers of the Royal Netherlands Navy Reserve in the Dutch East Indies was explained what kind of demands a designer had to deal with to come with a compromised design including as much as possible of the demands still without increasing the displacement. The lecturer mentioned that the main task of a submarine was to nearer the enemy without being sighted and to manoeuvre in such a position that she was able to torpedo her target. Large displacements were a disadvantage and submarines were just successful when they operated in large numbers. Large number of small submarines were to prefer above a few large submarines. The main reason to decide to increase the displacement was heavier military demands.

In an example with 3 types of submarines of which the surfaced displacement (800 tons) and a submerged buoyancy of 25%, fuel bunker capacity, range, armament, torpedoes and ammunition was similar were the influences described of changing range, speed and diving depth.

Type I tested on a diving depth of 60 metres had a maximum speed of 16 (surfaced)-9 (submerged) knots and a range of 2.500 (with a speed of 15 knots surfaced)-240 (submerged) nautical miles.

Type II tested on a diving depth of 80 metres had a maximum speed of 15 (surfaced)-8,5 (submerged) knots and a range of 1.900 (with a speed of 15 knots surfaced)-200 (submerged) nautical miles.

Type III tested on a diving depth of 100 metres had a maximum speed of 15 (surfaced)-8,5 (submerged) knots and a range of 825 (with a speed of 15 knots surfaced)-160 (submerged) nautical miles.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff (National Archive, The Hague, Netherlands) inv. no. 291. Lecture dated 28 March 1930 for aspirant officers of the Royal Navy Reserve in the Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch inland tug Janna

Oudeschild, Texel, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Owned by Scheepswerf Visser since 1993 part of the Damen Shipyard Group and since 1 October 2011 named Damen Shipyards Den Helder. 

The design demands for fleet submarines according to Dutch naval experts around 1930

In the Lecture dated 28 March 1930 for aspirant officers of the Royal Netherlands Navy Reserve in the Dutch East Indies was explained what kind of demands a designer had to deal with to come with a compromised design including as much as possible of the demands still without increasing the displacement. The lecturer mentioned that the main task of a submarine was to nearer the enemy without being sighted and to manoeuvre in such a position that she was able to torpedo her target. Large displacements were a disadvantage and submarines were just successful when they operated in large numbers. Large number of small submarines were to prefer above a few large submarines. The main reason to decide to increase the displacement was heavier military demands.

As example was chosen for the fleet submarine type which had to be able to follow the battle fleet and needed a maximum speed of 21-22 miles. There were 3 types of submarines described of which the displacement (1.500 tons), fuel bunker capacity, range, armament, torpedoes and ammunition was similar.

Type A was fitted out with 2.040 hp diesel engines allowing a maximum speed of 15,3 (surfaced)-10,5 (submerged) knots, a submerged range of 180 nautical miles and a test diving depth of 350 metres.

Type B was fitted out with 3.000 hp diesel engines allowing a maximum speed of 17,2 (surfaced)-10,5 (submerged) knots, a submerged range of 180 nautical miles and a test diving depth of 300 metres.

Type C was fitted out with 5.700 hp diesel engines allowing a maximum speed of 21,1 (surfaced)-8,5 (submerged) knots, a submerged range of 110 nautical miles and a test diving depth of 300 metres.

Main conclusion was that to increase the surfaced speed was the diving depth decreased just like the submerged speed and range. The result was that the weight of the battery could be decreased and the electric motors less powerful.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff (National Archive, The Hague, Netherlands) inv. no. 291. Lecture dated 28 March 1930 for aspirant officers of the Royal Navy Reserve in the Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch inland tanker Texel 1955-2016 (Amstel 2016-)


Oudeschild, Texel, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, ENI 3110406. Built by Visser, Den Helderm Netherlands in 1955. Owned by Cooperatieve Inkoop Visserijbenodigheden, Oudeschild, Texel, since 2003 by CIV, Oudeschild and renamed Amstel in 2016 and owned by Anton Vermegen, Zaandam, Netherlands. 

Submarine types as distinguished by Dutch naval experts around 1930

British submarine cruiser HMS X-1

French submarine cruiser Surcouf

All submarines built before the First World War were outdated since the war lessons were afterwards incorporated in new building and designing. There were now 5 different types; the tonnages/displacement were somehow arbitrary.
1. Submarine cruisers of 2.000-3.000 ton of which the artillery was their man armament (1)
2. Fleet submarines of 1.500-2.000 tons which were operate with the battle fleet. Their sized was needed to able to make the necessary speed to follow the battle fleet even with some swell.
3. Ocean going submarines of 800-2.000 ton to act offensively from ever desired position.
4. Coastal defence submarines smaller than 800 ton.
5. Submarine minelayers, usually also armed with torpedo tubes.(2)

Notes
1. Like the French Surcouf (displacement 3.250/4.304 tons, 2-20,3cm/8” guns) or British HMS X-1 (displacement 2.780/3.600 tons, 4-13cm/15.2” guns).
2. The Dutch Hr.Ms. O 19 and O 20 armed with 8-53,3cm/6” torpedo tubes, 20 mine tubes and an artillery armament of 1-8,8cm guns and 2x1-4cm machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff (National Arhcive, The Hague, Netherlands) inv. no. 291. Lecture dated 28 March 1930 for aspirant officers of the Royal Navy Reserve in the Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch inland tug Alkmaria-Victrix 1959-


Texel, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Oudeschild, Netherlands-flagged, ENI 3110448, Built by Visscher&Zn., Zwartsluis, Netherlands in 1959. First owned later by P. Daalder’s Aannemingsmaatschappij, Schoorl, Netherlands and nowadays by Ooms materiel B.V., Scharwoude, Netherlands. Dimensions 13,80 x 3,76 x 1,60metres. Fitted out with 1-167hp DAF engine. 

The Russian navy air force strength according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 6

An item referred to the Proceedings dated March 1939 reporting that the air force of the Russian navy numbered totally 4,210 aircraft including 696 training planes, 104 heavy and 300 light bombers, 490 reconnaissance planes and 2.620 fighters. The army seems to posses 8.818 aircraft including 1.400 training planes. There were fifty aircraft plants in the Soviet Union. 

Swedish coastal artillery strengthened by militia according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 8

An item referred to the Proceedings dated May 1939 reporting that Sweden strengthened her coastal artillery by 2 new militia contingents, one for the summer and one for the winter. 

Swedish chief of the defence staff proposed to keep a squadron through the whole year in service according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 8

An item referred to the Proceedings dated May 1939 reporting that the Swedish chief of the defence staff proposed the commission during the whole year of 3 ironclads, the mine cruiser Clas Fleming (1) and 2 of the new guard vessels. During the summer were also more ships to be in service.

Note
1. Building ordered in 17 May 1910, launched by Bergsund Finnboda, Stockholm, Sweden on 14 December 1912, commissioned in February 1914, overhauled in 1939-1940, stricken in January 1959 and then sold to be broken up. 

Dutch navy accommodation ship Zr. Ms. Thetis (A887) 1982-

Den Helder, Netherlands, 29 September 2010

Laid down by Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands on 12 October 1982, launched on 27 January 1983, commissioned on 14 March 1985. Displacement 800 tons and as dimensions 68 (maximum) x 12 metres. Crews numbers 106 men. Part of the Duik- en Demonteerschool Den Oever/Den Helder. 

Dutch Landing Platform Dock Zr. Ms. Johan de Witt (L801) 2003-



Harbour of Den Helder, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9280768, MMSI 244527000 and call sign PAJW. Especially built for amphibious operations on the frontier water-land. Able to act as floating headquarters for force of 50.000 military on land. Able to transport a complete amphibious marines battalion of maximum 555 men during 30 days and support then a land operation during 1o days and embark the battalion again. Contract for her building signed in May 2002. Laid down with yard number 393 at the Damen Shipyard at Galatz, Romania on 18 June 2003, the dry dock in which was the Casco was built, was filled with water on 26 October 2004 to allow towing the Casco to the deep part of the dock, later the Casco was towed towards the Damen shipyard at Vlissingen where she was completed, christened on Saturday afternoon 13 May 2006, trials 20 September-11 October and in December 2006, commissioned on Friday 30 November 2007 and handed over by the shipyard to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 7 March 2008. Accommodation for maximum 739 persons. Displacement maximum 15.500 ton and dimensions 176,35 x 29,2 x 5,9 metres. Speed 19,5 knots. Crew numbers 146 persons. Armwd with 2-3cm Goalkeeper systems. 

Dutch landing platform dock (LPD) Zr.Ms. Rotterdam (L800) 1998-


Harbour of Den Helder, Netherlands 29 September 2010

Ordered on 25 April 1994, laid down on 25 January 1996, launched on 22 February 1997 and commissioned on 15 April 1998. An amphibious transport or landing platform dock able to transport a complete battalion marines (611) with equipment. Enforcer-design as a result of a Dutch-Spanish project. IMO 9109756, MMSI 244159000 and call sign PARD. Loaded displacement and as dimensions 166 x 25 x 5,9 (medium) metres. Speed 20 knots. Crew numbers 153 men. Armament consists of 2 Goalkeeper CIWS systems, 4/10-12,7mm/0.50 machineguns and maximum 6 helicopters, 4 LCU or 6 LCVP’s. 

Maltese galley San Giacomo 1583

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 23 February 1583 with as commanding officer Giovanni Battista Somaia.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595.

Maltese galley San Giovanni 1583

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 23 February 1583 with as commanding officer Emilio Casati.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Maltese galley San Pietro 1583

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) on 23 February  1583 with as commanding officer Giovanni Enrique.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595.

Maltese galley San Giacomo 1582

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) in 1582 with as commanding officer Filippo de Tuyller de Hardemont.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595.

Maltese galley San Pietro 1582

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) in 1582with as commanding officer Frederico Cortez.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

Dutch inland tanker Hillegersberg 2005-


Waal off Zaltbommel. Netherlands 25 September 2010

Netherlands-flagged and EU 2327025. Casco built by Centromost Stocznia Rzeczna, Plock, Poland and completed by Bijlsma Shipyard, Lemmer, Netherlands for account of Wallestra B.V., Rotterdam, Netherlands in 2005.