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Monday, 11 December 2017

German harbour oil slop tanker Foline II 1910

Kiel, Germany, 29 April 2016

Owned by Harry Stallzus GmbH, Kiel, Germany. Built in 2010. 

Japanese bulk carrier Global Bay 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 December 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9512161, MMSI 370560000 and call sign 3FMP5. Built by Shikoku Dockyard, Takamatsu, Japan in 2009. Owned by Nissen Kaiun and managed by Kyowa Kisen, both at Imabari, Japan. 

British Tribal and J-classes destroyers available for service according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10

An item referred tot the magazine Revista Marittime dated July 1939 reporting that the 16-1.870 ton destroyers of the Tribal-class with a speed of 36 knots and an armament of 8-12cm/4.7’ and 4-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes were commissioned. The new destroyers were divided of the 6th flotilla part of the Home Fleet namely the Somali, Ashanti, Eskimo, Matabele, Bedouin, Mashona, Punjabi and Tartar and over the 7th flotilla part of the Mediterranean Fleet namely the Afridi, Cossack, Mohawk, Sikh, Zulu, Gurkha, Maori and Nubian. Some of the 1.690 ton destroyers of the J-class were also commissioned and divided over the same flotillas. The J-class destroyers had with a horsepower of 40.000hp a speed of 36 knots and an armament of 6-12cm/4” guns and 10-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes. 

The projected strength of the German fleet in 1942 according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 6

battleship Tirpitz

battle cruiser Scharnhorst

pocket battleship/heavy cruiser Admiral Graf Spee

An item referred to the Revista Marittime dated June 1938 reporting that in 1942 the German fleet was to consist of 2-35.000 ton battleships (1) armed with 38,1cm/15” guns, 2-26.000 ton battle cruisers(2)  armed with 28cm/11” guns, 3-10.000 armoured ships (3) armed with 28cm/11” guns, 2-10.000 cruisers (4) armed with 20,3cm/8” guns, 3-10.000 cruisers armed with 15,2cm/6” guns, 8 cruisers varying between 6.000-7.000 ton armed with 15,2cm/6” guns, 2-19.250 ton aircraft carriers (4), 22 destroyers varying between 1.625-1.800 ton, 30 smaller destroyers and 61 submarines.

Notes
1. Bismarck and Tirpitz.
2. Schanhorst and Gneisenau,
3. Admiral Graf Spee, Admiraal Scheer and Deutschland (renamed Lützow in 1940) of the Deutschland-class panzerschiffe, well known as the pocket battleships later reclassified as heavy cruisers.
4. The Admiral Hipper class heavy cruisers which were under the Anglo-German Naval Agreement to have a displacement of 10.000 tons, but which was actually varying between 18.492 and 20.118 tons and a main armament of 9-20,3cm guns. In the Kriegsmarine served the Admiral Hipper, Blücher and Prinz Eugen, the Lützow was sold to the Soviet Union in 1940 and the Seydlitz still uncompleted ceded to the Soviet Union.
5. The Graf Zeppelin never completed and the Flugzeugträger B which was laid down in 1938 but still on the slipway broken up in 1940. 

The Italian naval strength in 1941 according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 6

An item reported that the Italian fleet in 1941 was to number 678.265 tons divided over 8 battleships (244.000 tons), 1 aircraft carrier (4.960 tons), 9 heavy cruisers (85.431 tons), 15 light cruisers (85.532 tons), 86 destroyers (115.000 tons), 65 torpedo boats (41.542 tons), 130 submarines (99.800 tons) and 75 motor torpedo boats (2.000 tons). 

The active Italian submarine strength according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Revista Marittime dated March 1938 reporting that at that moment 80 Italian submarines were in active service. Fifty of these were stationed near the strait between Sicilia and Tunisia or 28 at La Spezia, 2-3 at Naples, 17-20 at Messina and 30 at Tarente. 

Moroccan light surveillance frigate Hassan II (612) 2001-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 December 2017

Laid down by Chantiers de l’Atlantique, St. Nazaire, France in 2001, launched on 7 December 2001 and commissioned in 2002. Floréal-class. Displacement 2.600 (standard)-2.950 (full load) tons and as dimensions 93,5 x 14 x 4,4 metres. The machinery consisted of 4 SEMT-Pielstick PA6 L280 BTC diesels supplying 9,600hp allowing a speed of 20 knots and with a speed of 15 knots is the range 10.000 nautical miles. Crew numbered 120 men including 11 officers. The armament consists of 1-7,6cm/62,2 OTO Breda Compact gun and 2-2cm/90 Giat machineguns and further more 2 NN38Exocet SSM missiles. 

British ship Crown of Scotland arrived in the Dutch East Indies coming from England according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 5th reported the arrival of the British ship Crown of Scotland coming from Liverpool, shipping agents J. Daendels&Co. 

Norwegian steamship Sverre arrived in the Dutch East Indies coming from Singapore according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 4th reported the arrival of the Norwegian steamship Sverre coming from Singapore, shipping agents E.C. Suermondt&Co. 

British steamship Devonshire cruising in the Dutch East Indiess according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 4th reported the arrival of the British steamship Devonshire master Purvis, coming from Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents Mclaine Watson&Co. 

German ship Hermann underway from Siam towards England according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated 2nd August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the German ship Hermann underway from Bangkok, Siam towards Falmouth, England for orders. 

German ship Raiser underway from England towards Singapore according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated 2nd August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the German ship Raiser underway from Cardiff, England towards Singapore. 

Sunday, 10 December 2017

Algerian frigate El-Moudamir (911) 2013-


Kiel, Germany 28 April 2016

Algeria-flagged, MMSI 605126440 and call sign 7TLT. MEKO A200AN-design which is an improved Valour-class design . El Radii-class consisting of the El Radii and El Moudamir. Departed in May 2017 towards Algeria. Probably ordered on 26 March 2012. Displacement 3.700 tons and dimensions 121 x 16 metres? Built by ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems. Armament consists of 1x Oto Melara 127/64 LW 127mm main gun (VULCANO ammunition?), 2-3cm MSI guns (SEAHAWK A2 model?), 16x SAAB RBS 15 Mk3 anti-ship missiles, 32x VLS for Denel Umkhonto-IR surface to air missiles, 2x MU90 torpedo launchers, 4x Rheinmetall MASS decoy launchers and2x WASS/Finmeccanica MORPHEUS acoustic countermeasures launching systems (on each side of the VLS cells. Building started in 2013, launched on 1 August 2016 and flag ceremony on 8 December 2016. 

German naval coastal tanker Ammersee (A1425) 1966-decommissioned

Kiel, Germany 28 April 2016

Germany-flagged, IMO 8986391, MMSI 211211810 and call sign DRKJ. Gross tonnage 1.256 ton, deadweight 2.000 ton, displacement 2.174 tons and as dimensions 74,20 x 11,22 x 4,54 metres or243.5 x 36.10 x 14.11 feet. Machinery consisted of 2 MWM diesels with 1.020kW horsepower. Speed 12,5 knots and with a speed of 12 knots a range of 3.250 nautical miles. Crew numbered 21 civilians. Launched by Lindenau Shipyard, Kiel, Germany on 9 July 1966, commissioned on 2 March 1967 and decommissioned on 31 December 2015. Of the Walchensee-class consisting of the Walchensee, Ammersee, Tegernssee and Westensee. 

Building of Japanese minelayer Sokuten Maru No. 1 planned according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1912-1913 no. 8

An item reported that at the shipyard at Maizuru, Japan was a the large Japanese minelayer Sokuten Maru No. 1 to be built and completed in 1914 and stationed in the Pescadores.(1)

Note
1. Of the Sokuten-class auxiliary minelayers, later called the Toshima-class. Laucnhed by Maizuru Naval Arsenal in March 1913, completed on 4 July 1913, renamed Sokuten on 1 July 1920 and decommissioned on 25 August 1936. 

Russian fleets executing gun exercises according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

General Admiral Apraksin as the Japanesw Okinoshima
Pamjat Azova

Minin

Dmitr Donskoi

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau reporting that since 16 May the Russian navy would held gun exercises for a period of 4 months in the Baltic Sea. Rear admiral Fölkersahm commanded for that purpose the battleships Imperator Alexander II and Nawarin [Navarin], the armoured coastal defences hips Admiral Uschakoff, General Admiral Uschakoff, General Admiral Apraxin, Admiral Greig, Admiral Lasareff, Perwenetz and Kreml, large cruisers Mini[n] and Pamjat Asowa, gunboat Grosa, torpedo cruiser Wojewoda and 4 large model torpedo boats. Totally were 30 officers, 150 corporal constables, 1.150 commodores and 200 artillery engineers to be trained. In East Asia was the aged armoured cruiser Dmitri Donskoi added as artillery training ship to the squadron there for a period of 6 months. In the Black Sea  were for the artillery training during 4-6 months and then 1st class reserve available the battleship Georgi Pobjadonnosseff [Georgii Pobedonets of the Ekaterina II-class], training ships Beresan, Prut and Dnjästr, gunboat Uraletz, transports Bug en Donetz and 2 torpedo boats available. On the Black Sea Fleet were 30 officers and 510 petty officers and sailors to be trained. 

British protected cruiser HMS Melampus launched according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1890-1891 no. 6


An item referred to the Army and Navy Gazette reporting the launching of HMS Melampus by Naval Construction and Armaments Company, Barrow on 2 August. She was one of the 29 cruisers 2nd class to be built under the Naval Defence Act a year later. With a displacement of 3.400 tons were the dimensions 300 x 22.9 feet. The armament consisted of 2-15,2cm/6” guns mounted on pivots, 6x1-12cm/4.7” quick firing guns mounted on pivots (each broadside 3), 8-6pd quick firing guns, 1-3pd Hotchkiss and 4-5barreled Nordenfelt guns.(1)

Note
1. Laid down at the shipyard of Vickers, Barrow-in-Furness, England on 30 August 1889, launched on 2 August 1890, completed in December 1891. Withdrawn as guard ship serving at Kingstown, Ireland in 1903 and finally sold to be broken up on 1 January 1910. Part of the Apollo-class, designed by William Henry White, preceded by the Pearl-class and succeeded by the Astrea-class, consisting of the Andromache, Apollo, Latona, Melampus, Naiad, Sappho, Scylla, Sybille, Terpsichore, Thetis, Tribune, Aeolus, Brilliant, Indefatigable, Intrepid, Iphigenia, Pique, Rainbow, Retribution, Sirius and Spartan and which were built under the 1889 Naval Defence Act. Torpedo armament consisted of 4-36cm/14” torpedo tubes. 

Classification and naming of US Navy ships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1890-1891 no. 6

An item referred to the Army and Naval Journal reporting that the US Congress changed an already by the Senate approved law dealing with the classification based on the displacement and naming of warships. Ships with a displacement of above 5.000 were classified as 1st class and to be named after the states in the USA. Between 3.000-5.000 tons were 2nd class and named after towns in the USA. Ships above the 3.000 tons were commanded by captains. Between 1.000-3.000 tons were 3rd class, commanded by commanders and named after events of persons which played a role in the maritime history of the USA. Below the 1.000 tons were 4th class, commanded by lieutenant commanders and lieutenants to be named after lakes and rivers in the USA. 

Swedish coastal defence ship Göta nearly completed according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1890-1891 no. 6

An item referred to the Army and Naval Journal reporting that the Swedish battleship Göta was nearing the completion.(1) Displacement 3.100 tons. The armament was to consist of 1x2-25cm/10” guns, 4x1-15cm/6” guns, 4 quick firing guns and torpedo launchers. Crew numbered 196 men including officers. Electrically lightened. Armour delivered by Schneider et Co., Creusot, France.

Note
1. Part of the Svea-class coastal defence ships consisting of the Svea, Göta and Thule, except for the 10” and 6” guns consisted the armament of 6x1-5,7cm/2.2” gins and 3-38cm/15” torpedo tubes. The armour belt had a thickness of 29cm/11.5” with the gun turret protected 29cm/11.5” thick armour. Built by Lindholmens Mekaniska Verkstad, Göteborg, Sweden, launched on 30 September 1889, commissioned on 1 July 1893 and decommissioned on 12 October 1923. 

Italian containership (ex-Clivia 200, Lykes Eagle 2000-2005, CP Eagle 2005-2006, Canberra Express 2006) MSC Shirley 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 December 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9224049, MMSI 636017022 and call sign D5IY3. Built by Stocznia Remontowa Nauta S.A./Gdynia Shipyard, Gdynia, Poland in 2000. Owned by FS Sara Limited, Genoa, Italy and operated by MSC-Mediterranean Shipping Company. As the Canberra homeport Hamburg, Germany, Germany-flagged, MMSI 218082000, owned and managed by Hapag Lloyd, Hamburg. Ex-Clivia renamed December 2000, Lykes Eagle renamed 18 August 2005, CP Eagle renamed 15 February 2006 and renamed Canberra Express in August 2006. 

Norwegian multi purpose offshore vessel Olympic Elena 2007-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 December 2017

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9367011, MMSI 311000544 and call sign C6CQ6. Owned and managed by Olympic Shipping, Fosnavaag, Norway. Earlier Norway International Register-flagged and MMSI 258055000 and homeport Fosnavaag. Built by Vard Aukra, Aukra, Norway in 2007. 

Japanese containership Vecchio Bridge 2005-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 December 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9293454, MMSI 371208000 and call sign 3EBR8. Owned and managed by Fukujin Kisen, Imabari, Japan. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2005. 

British steamship Falshaw cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 26 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 25th August reported the arrival of the British steamship Falshaw master Bennett coming from Cheribon, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents Wellenstein Krause&Co. 

American bark James G. Pendleton underway from the Philippines towards the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 26 August 1889

An item dated 23 August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the American bark James G. Pendleton underway from Ili-Ilo, Philippines towards Boston, USA. 

Hawaiian bark Foohng Spey underway from the Philippines via the Dutch East Indies towards the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 26 August 1889

An item dated 23 August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the Hawaiian bark Foohng Spey underway from Ilo-Ilo, Philippines via Batavia, Dutch East Indies towards Philadelphia, USA. 

British steamship Recorder passing Anjer, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 26 August 1889

An item dated 23 August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the British steamship Recorder which was repairing the cable between Singapore and Anjer, Dutch East Indies. 

British steamship Jumna underway from the Dutch East Indies towards England according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 26 August 1889

An item dated 23 August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the British steamship Jumna underway from Batavia, Dutch East Indies towards London, England. 

Chinese bulk carrier Grand Alma 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 December 2017

Hong Kong/China-flagged, IMO 9566825, MMSI 477759400 and call sign VRIM6. Owned and managed by Grand China International Shipmanagement, Shanghai, China. Built by Jinhai Heavy Industry, Zhoushan, China in 2011. 

Greek bulk carrier Kamari 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 December 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9412634, MMSI 538007192 and call sign V7YP2. Built by Chengxi Shipyard, Jiangyin, China in 2011. Earlier Hong Kong/China-flagged.Owned and managed by Nomikos Transworld Maritime, Athens, Greece. 

Saturday, 9 December 2017

French destroyer Le Hardi was launched at Nantes, France according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Revista Marittime dated June 1938 reporting that the French destroyer Le Hardi was launched on 4 May 1938. Her standard displacement was 1.772 ton, dimensions 117,20 x 11,10 metres and the horsepower 50.000hp. She was the first of a range of 11 destroyers of the same type now under construction in England, Germany and Italy.(1)

Note
1. Of the Le Hardi-class of which 12 were planned but just 8 completed, preceded by L’Adroit-class and succeeded by T 47-class. The Le Hardi-class was an answer on the Italian Navigatori-class destroyers and the Japanese Fubiki-class destroyers. Laid down by Ateliers et Chantiers de la Loire, Nantes, France on 20 May 1936, launched on 3 May 1938, scuttled at Toulon, France on 27 November 1942, refloated by the Italian navy and renamed FR 37, uncompleted fallen in German hands at Savona in September 1943 and scuttled at Genoa, Italy in April 1945. 

British Royal Navy was enlarging number of escort vessels according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10


With our thanks to Novice

An item referred tot the magazine Revista Marittime dated July 1939 reporting that the British Royal Navy was enlarging the number of available escort vessels by converting already existing ships and building 24-900 ton fast escort vessels. Converted to be the C-class cruisers Coventry, Curfew, Cairo, Calcutta, Capetown, Carlisle, Columbo and Curacao into anti aircraft cruisers and for this task to be fitted out with 10-10,1cm/3.97” anti aircraft guns and a large number of smaller anti aircraft guns. For escort purposes came available the 12-1.000 tons sloops of the Bridgewater, Shoreham and Falmouth class, each armed with 2-10,1cm/3.97” anti aircraft guns, 2-1.000 tons Aberdeen-class sloops, each armed with 4-10,1cm/3.97” anti aircraft guns, 2-Bittern-class sloops, each armed with 6-10,1cm/3.97” anti aircraft guns, 5-1.200 Egret-class sloops, each armed with 8-10,1cm/3.97” anti aircraft guns and 4 aged V en W-class destroyers, each armed with 4-10,1cm/3.97” anti aircraft guns. 

Royal British Navy building Black Swan-class sloops according to the Dutch Newspaper Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated August 1939 reported that the 1.250 ton Black Swan-class escort vessels had an armament of 8-10,2cm//3.97” anti aircraft guns. Their speed was 19 knots.(1)

Note
1. The Black Swan-class built between 1939-1943 and the Modified Black Swan-class built between 1942-1945. Of the originally planned 42 were 37 built of which 25 of the modified type. The displacement was 1.250 (original design)-1.350 (modified design) tons. Six were built for the Royal Indian Navy. After the Second War served (Modified) Black Swan -class sloops in the navies of Egypt, India, Pakistan and West-Germany. 

New building and/or modernizing of Swedish destroyers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10

An item reported that in June 1939 the Swedish destroyer Malinö (1) started executing her trials, the Karlskrona (2) was launched and the Ehrensköld and Nordenskjöld were fitted out with new boilers. Some of the smaller destroyers were to be fitted out with anti aircraft armament for future use as escort vessels. A twin torpedo gun was replaced by 4cm/1.57“ or 5,7cm/2.44” guns.

Notes
1. The Malmö. Of the Göteborg-class consisting of the Göteborg, Stokcholm, Malmö, Karlskrona, Norrköping and Gävle. Laid down by Eriksberg, Göteborg, Sweden in 1937, launched on 22 August 1938, completed in August 1939 and stricken in January 1967.
2. Of the Göteborg-class consisting of the Göteborg, Stokcholm, Malmö, Karlskrona, Norrköping and Gävle. Laid down by Örlogsvarvet Karlskrona, Sweden in 1937, launched on 19 June 1939, completed in September 1940 and stricken in July 1974.
3. Of the Ehrensköld-class consisting of the Ehrensköld and Nordenskjöld-class, preceded by the Wrangel-class. Laid down by Kockums, Malmö, Sweden in 1924, launched on 25 September 1926, completed in September 1927 and stricken in April 1963.
4. Of the Ehrensköld-class consisting of the Ehrensköld and Nordenskjöld-class, preceded by the Wrangel-class. Laid down by Götaverken, Göteborg, Sweden in 1924, launched on 19 June 1926, completed in September 1927 and stricken in April 1963. 

Russia stationing naval force in the White Sea according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1939 no. 2

An item referred to the Revista Marittime dated November 1938 reporting that a Soviet squadron consisting of 3 light cruisers, a flotilla destroyers and a flotilla submarines after the Baltic manoeuvres via the Stalin canal went to the White Sea. 

German sailing ship Kieler Hansekogge 1987-

Kiel, Germany 28 April 2016

Built between 1987-1991 by the Verein Jugend in Arbeit, Kiel, Germany as a replica of the Bremer Kogge von 1380. Except for the masts and yards built of oak. Fitted out with 2 Volvo-Penta engines. 

German rescue vessel Hindenburg 1944-

Kiel, Germany 28 April 2016

Built by Pahl Werft, Hamburg, Germany in 1944 and decommissioned in 1979/ Nowadays museum ship. 

German passenger ship Stadt Kiel 1934-


Kiel, Germany 28 April 2016

Germany-flagged, IMO 5337771, MMSI 211240870 and call sign DJUY. Launched by Krupp Friedrich Germaniawerft, Kiel, Germany on 26 May 1934. 

Dutch screw steamship 4th class Hr.Ms. Madura under repairs at the naval establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies in 1892

An item reported that the boilers on board of the Dutch screw steamship 4th class Hr.Ms. Madura which ere of a new type and now 1,5 year used needed to be modernized. Fort this purpose arrived she in July 1892 at the naval establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies. The panelling partly destroyed by termites was at the same time repaired and 1-3,7cm/1.5” quick firing gun mounted.(1)

Note
1. Call sign GQMW. On stocks 13 June 1879 at the Koninklijke Fabriek van stoom- en andere werktuigen, Amsterdam, Netherlands, launched on 21 March 1880, departed the shipyard on 29 June 1880, commissioned on 1 July 1880, departed towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies on 22 August 1880. Decommissioned and condemned for war duties on 12 February 1900 and to be used as pilot station ship (Moeara Djawa).

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1891-1892. 

Dutch paddle steamship 2nd class Hr.Ms. Bromo converted into a guard ship in 1892

Model Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original source


An item reported that in the period 1 October 1891-1 October 1892 the Dutch paddle steamship 2nd class Hr.Ms. Bromo was at the naval establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies rebuilt into a guard ship replacing the Hr.Ms. Soerabaya on 1 April 1892.(1) 

Note
1. call sign GQDF, iron-built with wood-planked, rigged but very worse sail performance, on stocks at the shipyard of the Kon. Fabriek etc., Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1873, launched in 1874, engines and boilers repaired in 1877, temporarily guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indies 27 August-13 November 1883, decommissioned 15 March 1890, needed major repaired and at the same time fitted out as guard ship at Batavia, commissioned as guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies as replacement of the Surabaya on 1 April 1892, decommissioned and replaced by the Koning der Nederlanden on 1 December 1899, used as store ship for the army during South Celebes-expedition in 1905, fitted out as coal hulk and serving at Merauke in 1910, stricken in in 1914, towed from Merauke towards Surabaya in 1916, sold there on a public auction an the naval establishment to the K.P.M. at 09.00 o’clock 12 November 1917, dimensions 60 (between perpendiculars) x 9,39-16,17 (over side wheels) x 4 metre, horsepower 200 nhp/950 ehp, an armament of 2 rifled 16cm guns and 4-12cm guns, and a crew numbering 100-134 men (1885: 101 Europeans, 33 natives).

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1891-1892. 

Dutch guard ship Hr. Ms. Gedeh docked and repaired 1892 at Tandjong Priok, Dutch East Indies in 1892

An item reported that the Dutch guard ship Hr. Ms. Gedeh was in June 1892 at Tandjong Priok, Dutch East Indies docked and the underwater hull cleaned. At the same time was the panelling earlier removed for a sufficient disinfection repaired. When docked she was examined and concluded that her hull was still in a good condition.(1)

Note
1. Flush decked corvette, of the Indies Military Navy, call sign GQJL, on stocks at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1872, launched 1874, guard ship at Surabaya 1876, guard ship at Surabaya 1 February 1883, transferred to Batavia, Dutch East Indies to serve there as guard ship 12 May 1884, decommissioned caused by several victims of cholera on board 14 April 1892, disinfected, docked, cleaned and painted and commissioned 28 July, in sinking condition towed in May 1899 towards Surabaya, decommissioned 1 June, condemned and broken up by own personnel, an armament of 10 guns (1885: 1-30pd guns no.11) and a crew numbering 157 men (122 Europeans and 35 natives).

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1891-1892. 

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Hr.Ms. Atjeh docked at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies in 1892


Model Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, NetherlandsOriginal source

An item reported that the Dutch screw steamship 1st class Hr.Ms. Atjeh was end March 1892 docked at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies including solving the problems with the rudder and screw.(1)

Note
1. Call sign GQCN, laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 3 March 1875, launched on 6 December 1876, commissioned on 1 November 1877, converted at the shipyard De Lastdrager, Den Helder, Netherlands into an accommodation ship in 1906, commissioned on 8 November 1906, also used as training ship for sailors and Royal Netherlands Navy reserve, decommissioned as training ship on 21 May 1921, accommodation ship for the air force at Willemsoord until 1922, disarmed and stricken in 1929, sold for ƒ 23.501,00 to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk’s industriële onderneming, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up on 4 June 1935. Iron-built and wood-planked, when she was sailing could the telescopic funnel be lowered and the screw lifted, frigate rigged.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1891-1892. 

Friday, 8 December 2017

Major part of the Japanese naval shipbuilding programmes realized according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated July 1939 reporting that in the meantime the ships built under the 1930 and 1933 programmes for the major part were commissioned. Totally were 83 ships with a total tonnage of 221.942 tons to be built. Namely 2 aircraft tenders (20.100 ton), 3 aircraft carriers (27.000 ton). 6 light cruisers (51.000 ton), 26 destroyers (36.888 ton, 15 submarines (21.200 tons), 5 minelayers (6.864 tons), 20 torpedo boats (11.688 tons), 6 minesweepers (2.952 tons), 6 submarine chasers (1.800 tons), 1-10.000 submarine mother ship, 2 oil tankers (2.4.000 tons) and 1-8.000 tons repair ship. 

Swedish mine cruiser Clas Fleming modernized according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10

An item reported that the Swedish cruiser Clas Fleming was to be fitted out with new machinery including boilers, her armament modernized and her mine storage enlarged.(1)

Note
1. Mine cruiser Clas Fleming, building ordered in 17 May 1910, launched by Bergsund Finnboda, Stockholm, Sweden on 14 December 1912, commissioned in February 1914, overhauled in 1939-1940, stricken in January 1959 and then sold to be broken up. 

Swedish navy building minesweepers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10

An item reported that the Swedish minesweeper Arholma (1) was commissioned and the Landsor (2) executing her trials. With a displacement of 369 tons and as dimensions 56,7 x 7,6 x 2,1 metres. The armament consisted of 2-7,5cm/2.95” guns, 1-2,5/1” anti aircraft gun and 2 depth charge throwers.

Notes
1. No. 53. Of the Arholma-class minesweepers consisting of theArholma, Landsort, Bremön, Holmön, Sandön, Ulvön, Bredskär, Grönskär, Ramskär, Örskär, Koster, Kullen, Vinga and Ven. Laid down by Örlogsvarftet Karlskrona, Sweden in 1936, launched on 27 April 1937, completed in April 1939 and stricken in April 1960.
2. No. 54. Of the Arholma-class minesweepers consisting of theArholma, Landsort, Bremön, Holmön, Sandön, Ulvön, Bredskär, Grönskär, Ramskär, Örskär, Koster, Kullen, Vinga and Ven. Launched by Örlogsvarftet Karlskrona, Sweden on 26 November 1937, completed in June 1939 and stricken in January 1964. 

British giant naval guns already after a few shots unusable according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1892-1893 no. 3

HMS Victoria

An item referred to the Army and Navy Journal reporting that in a recently Belgian magazine an anonymous author -possible a high ranked British navy officer- stated that the British 110 tons guns were in fact useless. Tests made clear that after just 25 shots the guns were unusable. Yet these guns were the main guns on board of the British battleships HMS Benbow (1), Sans Pareil and Victoria. After no more of one hour was 50% probably unusable. This was an example how worse England was prepared for a war at sea.

Notes
1. Part of the Admiral-class, consisting of the Benbow, Collingwood, Anson, Camperdown, Howe and Rodney, preceded by the Colossus-class and succeeded by the Victoria-class. Laid down by Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Company Limited, England on 1 November 1882, launched on 15 June 1885, completed in June 1888 and broken up in 1909. Main armament consisted of 2x1-41,28cm/16.25” breech loading guns.
2. Part of the Victoria-class consisting of the Sans Pareil and Victoria, preceded by the Admiral-class and succeeded by the Trafalgar-class. Laid down by Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Company Limited, England on 21 April 1885, launched on 9 May 1887, commissioned on 8 July 1891 and sold to be broken up on 9 April 1907. Armament consisted of 1x2-41,28cm/16.25” breech loading guns.
3. Part of the Victoria-class consisting of the Sans Pareil and Victoria, preceded by the Admiral-class and succeeded by the Trafalgar-class. Laid down by Armstrong, Mitchell&Co, Elswick, England with yard number 490 on 13 June 1885, launched on 9 April 1887, commissioned in March 1890 and sunk in collision with HMS Camperdown on 22 June 1893. Armament consisted of 1x2-41,28cm/16.25” breech loading guns. 

Gun turrets of the American monitor USS Miantonomoh fitted out with fans according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1892-1893 no. 3

An item referred to the magazine Nature reporting that the two main gun turrets of the American turret ship Miantonomoh were fitted out with electrically powered fans manufactured by Crocker Wheeler Company for exhausting the gases of gunpowder.(1)

Note
1. Building ordered on 23 June 1874, laid down by John Roach&Son, Chester, Pennsylvania, USA in 1874, launched on 5 December 1876, commissioned on 6 October 1882 and sold to be broken up on 26 January 1922. Main armament consisted of 2x1-25cm/10” 31cal breech loading rifles. 

Brigantine Albatross (1920)

Model by Rudolf Teuber

Built by the navy shipyard at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1920 as pilot schooner as the No. 2 part of 3rd District and as No. 3 of the 4th-5th District). Acquired by the German government in 1937 and used as a radio station ship for submarines in the Second World War. The Orion of the Lufthansa and Alk of Kriegsmarine? Used by the Dutch merchant shipping company Royal Rotterdam Lloyd as a training ship Albatross since 1949. Six years later acquired by Ernest K. Gann and rerigged as a brigantine and became in 1959 property of the American Ocean Academy again as training ship until she sunk on 2 May 1962 underway from Mexico to the Bahamas. With a displacement of 126,6 tons and as dimensions 21,95 (waterline)-27,35 (over all) x 6,55 x 3,20 metres. Sail area 371 square metres. 

German spar-decked corvette SMS Moltke 1875-1920

Model made by Rudolf Teuber in 1986

Of the Bismarck-class consisting of the Bismarck, Stein, Moltke, Gneisenau, Stosch and Blücher. Laid down by Kaiserlichte Werft Danzig, Danzig, Germany in 1875, launched on 18 October 1877, completed on 16 April 1878, renamed on 28 October 1911, since Acheron as a hulk for the U-boat crews stationed at Kiel, Germany and sold to be broken up in 7 July 1920. Building costs 2.814.000 German Mark.

3-Mast full ship rigged. Sail area 2.210 square metres. Displacement 2.843 (design)-2.994 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 72,18 (keel)-82 (over all) x 13,7 x 6,3 metres or 269.0 x 44.11 x 20.8 feet. The machinery consisted o 1-3 cylinder marine steam engine and 4 boilers supplying via 1 shaft 2,500 ihp allowing a speed of 12 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 1.940 nautical miles. Crew numbered including trainees 404-469 men. The armament consisted of 1-15cm/5.9” L/22 guns, 2-8,8cm/3.5” quick firing guns and 6-3,7cm/1.5” 5-barrelled guns. 

British merchant ship Crown of Scotland underway from England towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated 2nd August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the British ship Crown of Scotland underway from Liverpool, England towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies. 

American bark S.R. Lyman underway from Singapore towards the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated 2nd August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the American bark S.R. Lyman underway from Singapore towards New York, USA. 

British steamship Bhundara underway from Singapore towards Australia according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated 2nd August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the British steamship Bhundara underway from Singapore towards Australia. 

British bark Mobile Bay underway from the Philippines towards Queenstown according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated 2nd August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the British bark Mobile Bay underway from Manila, Philippines towards Queenstown for orders. 

British merchant ship Provincia underway from the Dutch East Indies towards the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 5 August 1889

An item dated 2nd August reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies of the British ship Provincia underway from Batavia, Dutch East Indies towards New York, USA. 

Thursday, 7 December 2017

Dutch-Swedish design for new 21th Century diesel electric submarine

20th Century before the Second World War

First Dutch submarine Hr.Ms. O 1

Dutch submarine Hr.Ms. K 1 to serve in the Dutch East Indies

Dutch submarine Hr.Ms. O 13 lost in the Second World War Still on Patrol

Polish submarine ORP Orzel lost in the Second World War Still on Patrol

Chart and graphic drawings are made by Alexander Mari van Maanen

20th Century after the Second World War
Never realized Dutch submarine design 2061 dating from 1947

Dutch 3-cylinder submarine Hr.Ms. Tonijn

Dutch submarine Hr.Ms. Zwaardvis. Original source

Walrus-class submarine

21th Century
Drawing by Alexander Mari van Maanen

The famous Dutch Walrus-class submarines design dating from the 1980s and commissioned since 1992 needed to be replaced in the next decade despite their midlife modernisations. Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding successor of the Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands and the Swedish firm Saab Kockums decided in 2015 to cooperate in designing a new submarine to be built at Vlissingen and at Karlskrona. Before the Second World War was De Schelde the most important submarine builder for the Royal Netherlands Navy also building the notorious Polish submarine Orzel. Although the new design resembles  the A26 type now used by the Royal Swedish Navy it will be a new type. One of the issues is to built submarines with a single hull either a double hull. In fact using a singe hull will be going back to the first submarine built in the Netherland, since then was chosen for a double hull. The Walrus-class consisting of the Walrus, Zeehond, Bruinvis and Dolfijn was preceded by the Zwaardvis-class. 

German navy sailing training 3-mast barque Gorch Fock (II) 1958-

Model made by Reinhard Depelmann between 1990-2005

Germany-flagged, homeport Kiel, Germany, NATO pennant A60, call sign DRAX and MMSI 211210280. Laid down by Blohm&Voss, Hamburg, Germany wit yard number 804 on 24 February 1958, launched on 23 August 1958 and commissioned on 17 December 1958.

Type 441. With a displacement of 1.760 tons and as dimensions 81,2 x 12 x 5,2 metres or 266 x 39 x 17 feet, Fitted out with a auxiliary 1-6 cylinder 1.660hp diesel. Speed using her engine 13,7 knots. 

German gunboat SMS Tiger 1889-1914

Model made by Gert Saeger around 1920

Part of the Iltis-class gunboats consisting of the Tiger, Iltis, Luchs, Eber, Jaguard and Panther, especially built for service in the colonies. Laid down as the Ersatz Wold at the Kaiserliche Werft Danzig, Germany in 1898, launched on 15 August 1899, commissioned on 3 Aril 1900 and scuttled at the German colony in the Kiatschou Bay, Tsingtao to prevent capture by the Japanese on 29 October 1914. Building costs 1.665 million German Mark.

Displacement 894 (design)-1.108 (maximum), gross tonnage 758 tons, net tonnage 495 tons and as dimensions 63,9 (keel)-65,2 (over all0 x 9,1 x 3,56 metres or 214 x 30 x 11.7 feet. The 2-3 cylinder horizontal triple expansion steam engines and 4 coal-fired Thornycroft boilers delivered via 2 screws 1.372 ihp allowing a speed of 14 knots and with a speed of 9 knots was her range 2.580 nautical miles. The crew numbered 130 men (including 9 officers). The armament consisted of 2-10,5cm/4.1” L/40 quick firing guns and 6 machineguns. 

US Navy increasing her coal stock in the Philippines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1907-1908 No. 8

An item reported that in the summer the USA regularly sent coal towards the Philippines. A month ago was already 30.000 ton Pocahontas coal for the US Navy at Cavite available and more as 100.000 ton or ordered or already underway, mostly with British ships.

Note
1. Probably as result of the growing tensions with Japan in that period

Obsolete Swedish armoured cruiser Fylgia still potential danger for Nrowegian and Danish merchant shipping according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1907-1908 no.7


An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that the diameter of the cylinders of the Swedish armoured cruiser Fylgia were respectively 850, 1.275 and 2x14,35cm. Piston stroke 8cm. 12 Yarrow boilers. Heating surface 12x267 square metres. Grid surface 12x4,85 square metres. Coal bunker capacity 350 (standard)-900 (maximum) tons and a range of 3.100 (standard)-8.000 (maximum) British miles. A Swedish export stated that she was a decreased British County design and already obsolete. Yet she was still important for the Sweden while she was able in an eventually war with Norway and Denmark to destroy their merchant marines lacking ships which could act with success to the Fylgia.

Note
1. Armoured cruiser, laid down by Finnboda, Stockholm Bergsund, Sweden in October 1903, launched on 21 December 1905, completed on 21 June 1907, rebuilt by Oscarshamn shipyard between 1939-1941, stricken on January 1953 still serving as a target until 1957 when she was sold to be broken up. 

New British torpedo boats just numbered instead of receiving names according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1907-1908 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the 24 new British torpedo boats were numbered 1-24 instead of receiving a name as originally was intended. Their armament consisted of 2-7,5cm/3” quick firing guns (1 fore, 1aft) and 3 torpedo launchers on the keel line. 

German armoured frigate SMS Deutschland converted into a target according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1907-1908 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that the former German battleship Deutschland now named Jupiter was converted into a target costs 400.000 Mark. In September was she used as an armoured target. The report of the gun exercises was probably to kept secret.(1)

Note
1. Of the Kaiser-class, consisting of the Kaiser and Deutschland, preceded by the Preussen-class and succeeded by the Sachsen-class. Laid down by Samuda Brothers, Poplar, London, England in 1872, launched on 12 September 1874, commissioned on 20 July 1875, renamed as harbour ship Jupiter in 22 November 1904 and sold to be broken up in 1910. Casemate ship. 

Italian torpedo cruisers Agordat and Coatit laid down according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1895-1896 No. 9

An item reported that at Castellamare the two Italian torpedo cruisers Agordat (1) and Coatit (2) of the Partenope-design were laid down. Displacement 87,6 x 9,30 x 3,33 (aft) metres and a displacement of 1.313 tons. Armour belt with a thickness of 10cm and an armoured deck.

Notes
1. Part of the Agordat-class consisting of the Agordat and Coatit, preceded by the Penelope-class. Laid down by Castellammare on 15 February 1897, launched on 11 October 1899, commissioned on 26 September 1900, rearmed into a gunboat in 1921 and sold to be broken up on 4 January 1923.
2. Part of the Agordat-class consisting of the Agordat and Coatit, preceded by the Penelope-class. Laid down by Castellammare on 8 April 1897, launched on 15 November 1899, commissioned on 1 October 1900, converted into a minelayer in 1919 and sold to be broken up on 11 June 1920. 

Tests with French submarine Gymnote very successful according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1890-1891 no. 6

An item referred to the Temps reporting that the tests executed at Toulon, France some months ago with the French submarine Gymnote had been very successful. The roads were blockaded by torpedo boats and the submarine was ordered to break through the blockade without being noticed. She issued in 40 minutes a distance of 2,6 nautical miles, surfaced far outside the blockade returned to the harbour passing the torpedo boats under water. One torpedo boat sighted her when she was returning but lost her out of sight before she could start with chasing her.(1)

Note
1. The Q1, all electric submarine, laid down on 20 April 1887, launched on 24 September 1888, decommissioned in 1908 and sold to be broken up in 1911. 

British Royal Navy testing the Brennan torpedo according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1890-1891 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine Engineering dated 13 July 1890 reporting that at the end of the budget year 1889-1890 the British cabinet already paid around 1,5 million guilders for buying and manufacturing of Brennan torpedoes and still to pay another 384.000 guilders. In the last week were some important tests executed along the coast of the island Wight. An aged 500 tons coal brig while towed passed with a speed of 10 miles the torpedo station. While passing was a torpedo fired rapidly approaching her target although first too far backward. With slightly changing the course was the brig at starboard side strike and due to the 150 kg explosives totally destroyed. 

Wednesday, 6 December 2017

German submarine Seehund or Type XXVII 1944-1945



Built at the German shipyard, Kiel, Germany between 1944-1945. In February 1995 was what left of her find in the Kiel Fjord when the third ferry terminal was under construction. The design for the two man crewed submarine dated from 1944 and there were 1.000 to be built, 285 were in fact completed numbered between U 5501 and 6442) and just 138 saw active of which 34 were lost while used. With a submerged displacement of 17 tons were the dimensions 12 x 1,5 metres or 39 x 4.9 feet, The machinery consisted of a 160 Büssing diesel and a 25hp AEG electric motor allowing a speed of 7 (surfaced)-3 (submerged) and a range of 270 nautical mile while surfaced with a speed of 7 knots and 63 nautical miles while submerged with a speed of 4 knots. The armament consisted of 2-53,3cm/21” G7e torpedoes with a length of 7,16 metres. 

German non-nuclear submarine U-32 (S182) 2000-


Kiel, Germany 28 April 2016

Ordered in 1898. Built by Nordseewerke, Emden/Holwaldtswerke, Kiel, Germany. Type 212A after design process started with the Type 212 which was an improved Type 209-design. Laid down on 11 July 2000, launched on 4 December 2003 and commissioned on 19 October 2005. Machinery consists of 1 diesel and 1 electric motor.

General technical specifications. Displacement 1.524 (surfaced)-1.830 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 56 x 6,80 x 6,40 metres or 183.9 x 22.4 x 21.0 feet. Speed 12 (surfaced)-20 (submerged) knots. Range 8.000 nautical miles with a speed of 8 knots and an endurance of 3 (without snorkeling)-12 weeks. Diving depth 250-more as 700 (crush) metres or 820-2.296 feet. Crew numbers 27 (including 5 officers) men. Armament consists of 2x3-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes and optional 24 external naval mines.